Core Curriculum

Mission Statement

Rooted in the Assumptionist and Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition of charity, the love for learning, the integration of faith and reason, and the pursuit of truth wherever it is to be found, Assumption College’s Core Curriculum introduces students to essential works, ideas, and enduring goals of the liberal arts and sciences.  Emphasizing the humanizing role that disciplines such as philosophy, theology, literature, and political science play in the tradition of Catholic higher education, the Core contributes to the formation of thoughtful citizens and students committed to the challenge of lifelong learning.  Deepening and broadening the foundations of students’ learning in their major and minor fields of study, the Core Curriculum cultivates the habits of mind, learning practices and skills, passion for truth, and love of wisdom that are hallmarks of an Assumption College education.

What Is The Core?

The Assumption College Core is composed of five areas of study, each of which brings perspective to a classical liberal arts education. Within these areas students are able to choose courses that best match their academic and personal interests. Coupled with professional preparation, the cultivation of a devotion to service and an embrace of the conversation between faith and reason, the Core Curriculum ensures that Assumption graduates are ready to embark upon a life-long voyage of discovery and equipped to lead lives of meaning.

  • Core Seminars: The Core Seminars, taken at the beginning of your college career, aid you in embracing the philosophical, literary and theological texts that form the basis of human thought while developing your reasoning, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Your core seminar experience lays the foundation for all programs of study.
  • Person and Society: You’ll contemplate the relationship between individuals and their communities through the perspectives of history and the social sciences, gaining insight into the human condition. You’ll learn how history, politics, economics, psychology and sociology all play an important role in how we go about our daily lives.
  • Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning: You’ll explore mathematics and the natural and social sciences, becoming familiar with quantitative and empirical reasoning. These important building blocks will deepen your awareness of how the world is discovered and evaluated through analysis and scientific inquiry.
  • Culture and Expression: Through courses in culture, language and the fine arts, you’ll learn how human beings around the world express themselves, their beliefs, their struggles and their hopes and dreams. You’ll become a better communicator and hone your creativity and unique voice. 
  • The Great Conversation: By engaging in spirited discussion, grounded in the works of some of history’s greatest thinkers, you’ll deepen your appreciation for, and understanding of, how ideas and great writing shape both the lives of individuals and the evolution of societies.

The following is a brief outline of the Assumption College Core Curriculum and the courses an Assumption College student will take to fulfill requirements for graduation.

Core Seminars

Reading and writing intensive core seminars will help you develop the core skills you’ll need to be successful in college and will introduce you to important concepts in the humanities. Core seminars are capped at 22 students, or fewer, to ensure a personalized educational experience.

Core Seminar Courses

  • English Composition
  • Introduction to Literature
  • Socrates and the Search for Truth
  • A second Philosophy course
  • Introduction to Theology
  • A second Theology course

Person and Society

You’ll study the interaction between individuals and society through the lenses of history and the social sciences.  Through considering the complex interchange between commerce, history, politics, psychology and sociology you’ll gain a unique insight into the modern world.

Person and Society Courses

  • A History course such as The West and the World, History of Western Civilization or U.S. History
  • A Social Science course chosen from a broad selection of fields such as Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology
  • One of the following:
    • A second History course
    • A second Social Science course

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning

Courses in the natural and social sciences courses will help you hone your skills in quantitative and empirical reasoning, as well as build an understanding for how scientific inquiry informs the foundations of what we know and how we understand the world.

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning Courses

  • A Math course, Elementary Functions or higher
  • A Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science or Physics course
  • One of the following:
    • A second Science course
    • A second Math course, a Computer Science course or a Statistics Social Science

Culture and Expression

In Culture and Expression you will finding your creative voice and develop an understanding of the many different ways human beings communicate. By exploring culture, language and the fine arts you’ll develop essential skills of communication, understanding and imagination.

Culture and Expression Courses

  • An Art History, Music, Graphic Design or Performance course
  • A Foreign Language (one semester if continuing a language, two semesters if starting a new one)
  • A Global Awareness course

The Great Conversation

As a participant in the Great Conversation you’ll explore the great and enduring questions that shape what it means to be human and learn how others throughout history found their own answers.

Great Conversation Courses

  • One of the following:
    • A second Literature course
    • A Political Science course
  • One of the following:
    • A third Philosophy course
    • A third Theology course